Frigid: Prologue

“Bundle up.”
That’s what he said to me.
I don’t know exactly what made me so fed up at that time, but I was. The discourse in my life, it had reached a level that was totally unbearable to me at the time. The shouting, the arguing, the fighting, crying, panicking. Logic eluded me at that time. All I wanted was an escape, and a solution. And I thought I knew how to get those.
I knew it was stupid, I knew that. But what else was a kid to do, being the victim of a narcissistic abuser like that, with no other options? CPS didn’t do anything. Cops didn’t do anything. Family didn’t do anything; they didn’t even believe me. And all the while I was suffering just about every day. You haven’t felt it. A house with the floor made of eggshells upon which I tread softly but still reap the hatred. I felt the cracking every day, especially of the recent days. And what do you do when there’s a house floored with hazardous materials? You leave.
My two accomplices were helping me. My friend and her friend, both of which I met online. You know, it’s shameful when two people you’ve never met in person are designated to save you from one person whose been with you for 16 out of 16 years. The blood was really thin.
Earlier, a fracas ensued. Such had been waiting to happen since the hellish chain of events late the passing summer. It was now November and this conflict had come to a head. It was the beginning of the end of my depressive phase and yet, I saw this as my only obstacle. But my family, they were a real obstacle. They were an immovable object, and I was a completely and utterly stoppable force. I had to break through. And I had a plan.
The first friend, Alys, was who I considered to be my best friend. We’d met online a few years prior and had kept in touch on and off ever since. The other friend, Yanni, was someone I met only about a month prior, and he was the “boyfriend” of Alys (don’t ask why I put that in quotes). Alys, she ended up telling Yanni everything, and he was very willing to help me. He lived far away, but he had room in his house. I could lodge with him until things got better, I just had to be able to get there. After the argument–I can’t even remember what triggered it– I called Yanni. He and I both agreed that it was time for me to bounce. We spent about 10 minutes planning the logistics of it. I would leave, walk out the back door in the dead of night, and arrive at the hospital. They would see my desperation, and there would be no way they’d have the heart to send me back to that house.
I only saw 1 problem: the bitter cold. It was around freezing those upcoming days, and I knew that the cold would bite my skin, almost as hard as I liked to bite myself in anger. So I brought that up to him. I said to him “it’s gonna be cold out. What should I do to at least prevent hypothermia or something?”
He just told me “Bundle up”.
And I listened to him.

Writing Ideas

Hello all, and happy Thanksgiving time! For those of you who recognize it, that is.

So, I know I’m keeping up the pattern of sparsely posting here and neglecting to keep up. I actually was about to make a post yesterday, about my experience working at a haunted house; sort of a late Halloween season-themed post. But then, I made a decision. I remember why I made this blog—to share all of the awesome writing, art, and spiritual concept I love. And I realize that I’m starting to stray farther from that that I’d thought.

So now, I’m collecting a bunch of different writing ideas from you guys and doing some of them, and putting them here on my blog. This is a good way for me to what people are interested in and to continue with my writing at the same time. It’ll be fun to see what you guys want to see, and I’ll have a great time making your ideas come to life.

I do also have some ideas of my own that I’m working on, and I’ll still work on those as well, but I’d still like to take on some new ones. So if you have anything that you want to be done, any poems or short stories, send your ideas my way! Poems and short stories are my forté, and you can check out some of the other things I’ve done by searching throughout this blog. Have an amazing day, and I can’t wait to hear all of your wonderful ideas!

 

A Fairly New Style For Me

This is a nice little poem I wrote while experimenting with different poetic meters. The idea came to me suddenly about 2 weeks ago, causing me to scramble to write it down, only finishing it on Tuesday. I hope you enjoy it, even with my tendency to write about sad stuff.

————-

O’er to the market, come back to see me
When you are done I would like to apologise

Four nights apart and not once that I saw thee 

Ere to this day we did hate and we agonize 
Fret and a strife, but now all that is done with

Done is the hate that will split us apart 

Bad words retracted, redacted and onward

Honesty, gallantry, values and heart.
Back from the market, come to my residence

I shall announce that I’d like to part ways

Sad as you must be, cry as you will

But I know that you sure would have done me the same

Hate and Love: Creative writing poems

Hello all! I’m eager to share with you these two poems of mine that I wrote. I first published these on my old unused blog about 2 years ago, but I felt like it’d be nice to post it here too. 

I especially like them because of how they were written. They go along with each other well, really. The first one is what’s known as a lipogram, where none of the words have one specific letter. For that, I chose to omit the letter ‘L’. Then there’s a reverse lipogram, where every word has to contain a specific letter. I chose to include the letter ‘L’ in every word. So in a way, they’re both opposites while also being linked together. 

I plan to do more work like this in the future, having to use specific rhyme schemes and word patterns. I hope you enjoy these twin poems, though! 

—————————-

Hate

Human nature requires it

But human prosperity detests it.

How are we such hypocrites

We manage to perpetuate something

Then go around and preach of us being the ones to deter it?

It’s just negative passion

But passion yet the same

Have it, don’t be it

Don’t ignore it, just see it.

Love

Ailment? Accolade?

Alas; all simply loose, loose melodies plus woeful flower petals plucked slowly, carefully, hopefully

Possibly futile, still always relentless

Joyful, still melancholy

Temperamental, still jovial

Actually, only negligible

The Layman’s Guide To Publishing A Book

I must say, a lot of people have been asking me about exactly how to write a book. I’ve written and published my own young adult fiction book, The Month Of June. It surprised me how many people have never met an actual author before. When I tell them, most people react by asking about how I did it. I’ve gotten so many responses of “How did you do that?” or “Can you help me publish my own book?”

It inspires and motivates me when I hear that people like what I do, and that they would like to do the same thing. Publishing a book is a very rewarding experience, and can really teach you a lot. Unfortunately, many people who want to be an author end up giving up on their dreams, thinking that the process is too difficult and a lot of work for just a little bit of payoff. In reality, while writing a book is not a simple thing to do, anyone that really wants to and has the perseverance can do it.

I present to you this guide on how to publish your own book, in the simplest words possible. I understand how frustrating it can be to look up advice but the only things you can find are in confusing vernacular that you don’t understand. Short and sweet but still comprehensive, this guide will tell you all that you need to know to get your own book out there.

 

Step 1: Write your book

This, right here, is probably the most important part of the whole process, and arguably the most neglected. Before you really do anything in the publishing process, you have to have the entire book finished—completely finished.

People wonder what the first step in getting themselves published is; this is it, hands down. I see people coming up with all these ideas for cover designs, marketing ideas, and shelf space in local stores, but their book isn’t complete yet. This is a big mistake. It’s easy to get ahead of yourself when thinking of the big picture, but you just have to remind yourself to take it slow, pay attention to details and write a good, quality book. That will pay off a lot more in the long run than trying to sell a rushed, low-quality book.

(If you’re having trouble actually writing the book, like coming up with ideas, plots, etc., this article probably isn’t what you’re looking for. Another article, The Layman’s Guide To Writing A Book, will be published and linked here.)

Once you have written your book in it entirety, you will have what’s called a manuscript—a document or folder containing every part that will be in your final book. The manuscript doesn’t count the table of contents, acknowledgements and other sections that don’t have to do with the plot or the content of the book itself. These are still important and will come in later, but are not included in the manuscript or in the process of writing the book itself. It might be a good idea to start thinking of that stuff now, though, to save some time and to make the whole book connect well.

 

Step 2: Choose how to publish

The next step is to choose how you want to publish your book. There are 2 ways to do it; they are both very different and have their own pros and cons.

The first method is just regular publishing, known as traditional publishing. With this method, you take your manuscript and send it to a company, which will take your book and do everything for you.

I consider this to be its own step because there are several things you need to consider when choosing a publishing method. These include your budget, experience, writing ability, book format, and how much time you have. If you’re a first-time author, looking for a good profit, or are willing to put in more effort to actually getting your book out there, then self-publishing is definitely the way to go. If you’re willing to invest a good amount of money into your book, have confidence in your writing, want a perfect, flawless final book, and your main focus is getting yourself on the main stage no matter what it takes, you should think about traditional publishing.


Traditional Publishing Self Publishing
Ease Can be quite difficult. Requires a lot of effort and persistence Easy to do; almost anyone can do it, if they have the right tools
Time (after book is written) Anywhere from about 6 weeks to over 6 months About 2 to 6 weeks
Money Can take a few hundred to a few thousand dollars. Different options. Free, takes a portion of your profits, or a package that can cost about as much as regular publishing.
Legitimacy Professional and recognizable. Looks legit; people, companies, and contests are more willing to accept it. Might be seen as sketch or unprofessional. Not eligible for many contests and benefits.
Skill/Experience Knowledge in writing and publishing greatly helpful. Previously published authors or those who have help from others. Not much extensive knowledge needed in the field. Not necessary to have worked with similar things before.
Accessibility Lots of help and problem solving available to you. Editors, marketing managers, proofreaders, and many other specialists are there to help you. Not much help; the help that is given is in the form of FAQs and articles on the website of the company. Very little if any human help is given.
Inventory Must order hundreds of copies at one time Can order as many or as few copies as you wish
Exposure Extensive marketing that will gain exposure for your book nicely and efficiently Extra effort will have to be put forth in order for your book to gain the exposure it needs
Reward Lots of popularity and high potential Creative freedom and good profit

While there are benefits to both, my book The Month Of June was self published, so that’s the option that I have more experience with. I’ll still discuss both options in detail, but I might know a few more details about self publishing because of this.

 

Step 3: start the process

Now,  you’re ready to truly start publishing your book. The only thing standing between you and having your work displayed out to the entire world, is these next few steps.

-Traditional publishing 

The first thing you need to do is choose a publishing company. This is the company that will take care of you and your book during the entire publishing process. Each publisher has different types and standards for what books they choose to publish. The company will read your manuscript and decide if they want to publish it. If they do, they will print it for you, can ship you the copies, and will provide a variety of other services.

A ton of different options available for you as to which publishing company you want to choose. There are a handful of big name publishers out there–Penguin, Random House, Harper Collins, and Scholastic. They are the publishers of some of the best, most popular, and most lucrative books around. If you’re lucky and skilled enough to get published by one of these companies or their children, then a long successful future with your book is guaranteed. But these companies have very strict standards and are very hard to get into. A successful book is very attainable with a lesser known publisher.

The way I see it, choosing a publishing company and getting published is very much like applying for college. There are so many different options, some more popular than others, some more successful others. Each one also has different benefits and services that are meant to attract new people. You can apply, but there’s no guarantee for getting in, and the better you are, the better chance you have to get into one of the better options. After a long, strenuous waiting period, you’ll either be met with the bitter taste of rejection and uncertainty, or the sweet taste of success and a bright future.

Assuming that the second option will happen, then this step is almost taken care of. Your company will do almost everything for you. First, they’ll edit your manuscript–they will make sure that there are no spelling, grammar or punctuation mistakes. Then they’ll format it, which is when they take the text and make it fit into the layout of the book. This is when it goes from a text file you send them, to the actual appearance it will have when fully printed. They’ll all work with you and make sure that it will be just what you want.

Then, they should ask you to write the front matter sections. These are the parts of the book that comprise the first few pages, and aren’t actually part of the book itself. This includes the table of contents, acknowledgements, the preface, and the half-title – that part at the very beginning that just states the title again. I must admit that I have less experience in traditional publishing, so I’m not 100% sure at what point they do this. But I’ve always presumed they do it at this point, so I’ll add it here. Note that not all of the sections are required, and there are actually a few end matter sections as well. Click here for a list of all the different front and back sections.

-Self publishing

This step is actually quite different than in traditional publishing. Unlike its lengthy and more expensive counterpart, you don’t have to wait for any sort of approval to publish your book. The publishing process can begin as soon as you’re done writing it. No approval, no phone calls; you just find a good provider and you can start it off whenever you want.

There are several different self publishing websites you can use. I’ve looked into and even used more than one website over the years. Kindle Direct Publishing, Lulu, and Createspace are the ones I’ve used, and I’ve looked into a few others. They all have slightly different things to offer, but the one I use and highly recommend is Createspace. They are owned by Amazon, so once you publish on there, it also goes on the Amazon website, and they’ll help you make it into a Kindle Ebook as well. They can even get it on the Barnes & Noble website, which will make it available for order in stores!

Whatever website you use, you’ll have to make an account on there, of course. Then you have to make the first basic decisions for your book. Decide what the trim size will be. This is what the dimensions of the book will be when it’s completely printed. The most common trim size for an average novel is about 6″x9″ (15×23 cm), but you do have flexibility, especially depending on what book you’ve written. Obviously, a picture book is not gonna have the same trim size as a sci-fi novel.

Then, depending on what size you choose, they will give you a template, which is a file you download that you paste your book and information into, which will then be printed as the final book. This is the equivalent of the formatting section of the traditional publishing section.

publishinglayout

This is an example of an average self publishing template. You take the applicable information and enter it inside the template